Category: Nano-Imprint Lithography

Addison Clear Wave Has Updated Its Photo Nanoimprint Lithography (P-NIL) Resins Brochures

ACW has updated its brochures for resins for P-NIL applications.  The updated brochures include the results of environmental and thermal shock stress tests on resins coated on glass.  The environmental stress tests were 1000 hours at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity.  The thermal shock tests were 1000 cycles of 150 °C for 30 minutes Read More…

High Refractive Index (RI) Resins for Bright Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE)

High brightness diffractive optical elements (DOE) employ high refractive index (RI) materials.  A cost-effective approach to these DOEs is to use a high RI resin that can be processed rapidly by photo nano-imprint lithography (P-NIL) methods.  ACW has been a leader in developing resins for P-NIL since the methodology was referred to as 2P (for Read More…

Non-Yellowing P-NIL Resin for Diffractive Optical Element (DOE)

Photo nanoimprint lithography (P-NIL) processes are cost effective methods for production of diffractive optical elements (DOE) used in holographic displays.  A limiting factor for this method is the environmental stability of the P-NIL resin.  If the P-NIL material yellows considerably with aging, the DOE with have limited utility.  In automotive applications, for example, the DOE Read More…

BD-400: Automotive Tough P-NIL Resin

Photo-Nanoimprint Lithography (P-NIL or UV-NIL) is a versatile technique for low-cost nanoscale device fabrication with a wide range of applications.  As automobiles with increasing numbers of detectors evolve, opportunities for P-NIL fabricated lenses will increase.  But, for the automotive industry, P-NIL materials must survive extreme stress conditions required to demonstrate automobile efficacy.  BD-400, ACW’s premier Read More…

Nanoimprint Lithography Resins

UV or photo Nano-Imprint Lithography (UV-NIL or P-NIL) is a versatile technique for low-cost nanoscale device fabrication. The precise, direct patterning and repeatable replication of complex three-dimensional nanoscale patterns (submicron, 10’s of nanometers) in a single step make the NIL technique compelling in comparison to other expensive techniques such as e-beam or helium ion beam Read More…